The Paradox of Spiritual Seeking

In their search for enlightenment, some persons cross deserts or and climb mountains at great peril to themselves. Others seek realization at the feet of their beloved masters listening expectantly to every word. Still some attend weekend seminars or study sacred texts late into the night.

While there are a great many seekers, there appear to be few finders. Perhaps this confirms that, by definition, a seeker can never be a finder.

If I am seeking, I am seeking some thing – an object which is other than me. I am the seeker; the object is the sought. There is the duality of I – and that which I seek.

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Presence, Neurons, and the Internet

Presence, neurons, and the internet: these concepts are intimately related in an unsuspecting and unfavorable way which might concern you, if in your pursuit of authenticity, you practice presence.

Contemplative traditions consider the practice of presence the sine qua non (“without which nothing”) of spiritual unfolding. The Tibetan Dzogchen master, Namkhai Norbu, for example, considers presence to be “the ultimate” practice.

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10,000th Visit!

The Personal Authenticity Project was inaugurated on June 18, 2010. One year, 2 days later we received our 10,000th visit. Thanks for the support of your interest in fostering personal authenticity both within and and also without.

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Whose Life are You Living?

Sometimes the lives we live – or don’t live – weigh heavily upon our souls. We feel alienated, bored, discontent, anxious, or depressed. It is then that we might be tempted to turn away from such pain by losing ourselves in mind-numbing distractions such as TV, the internet, or another glass of wine. On the other hand, we might instead turn off the distractions, turn towards our symptomatic pain, and listen to its potentially life-changing message.

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Who are You? Who is the Self that Would be Authentic?

How would you reply, were I to ask you, “Who are you?” Actually, take a moment to consider who you are. Really! Who are you? Perhaps you might pause a moment, and say out loud who you think you are. Someone might reply to me, “My name is Sarah, I am a 41-year-old architect. I am divorced, and the single mom of two children. Between driving my daughter to karate, my son to soccer, minding a house, and keeping my career, I’m exhausted!” I might reply, “Sarah, I understand your exhaustion. Yet how can this be you? There was a time when you hadn’t children. A time when you were in love with your fiance. A time when you were a college student, not an architect. Wasn’t that you back then too? ”

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